Amorphophallus titanum flowering, 1901

Purchase This Item For Download
world rights, single editions, non exclusive use

Please Select A License Option

For one off display, up to A1 in size, for a period up to 3 years
up to 5 years
For use in exhibition deisplay for up to 6 months £400 - £750
For personal use only, not to be used commercially
up to half size
Any singleprint usage, billboard, ad, insert, display
no larger than three quarters of the page
no larger than one eighth of a page
Not more than three quarters of the page in size
No larger than one eighth of the page
For printing as part of a display, one use only, not for promotional use
^ Please refine your license choice

Other options available, please contact us for more details

The Titan arum, Amorphophallus titanum is known as the corpse flower in its native Indonesia because of the rancid smell, described by Curtis's Botanical magazine as a mixture of rotten fish and burnt sugar, which it emits as it flowers. It caused a sensation when it first bloomed at Kew in June 1889; the odour attracted "many bluebottle flies" and visitors were greatly disturbed by the smell. The artist Matilda Smith, who recorded the first flowering endured many hours painting it and consequently felt ill. The inflorescence can grow to more than 2.5m and is surrounded by a single purple leaf. These photographs were taken over a four-day period during a later blooming in 1901.

Copyright © RBG KEW

Media ID 10645190

Date: 12th February 2015

Copyright Status: Copyrighted Work

Owner URL: http://www.kew.org/

Credit: Copyright RBG Kew

Filename: p102 - 103 006838LA20120727-107 Titan Arum.jpg

Image Size: 6545 x 3851 Pixels

Filesize is 4.63MB

Associated Categories: History

Associated Categories: History

Keywords:  1901  amorphophallus titanum  black and white  blooming  botanic garden  botanical  botanical garden  botanical gardens  corpse  days  flower  history  inflorescence  june  kew  mono  monochrome  opening  rbg kew  rotten  sequence  smell  stink  titan arum