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Curtis's Botanical Magazine Gallery

Illustrations selected from Curtis's Botanical Magazine

Choose from 207 images in our Curtis's Botanical Magazine collection.


Sparaxis pulcherrimum, 1866 Featured Curtis's Botanical Magazine Image

Sparaxis pulcherrimum, 1866

Current accepted plant name is Dierama pulcherrimum, commonly known as angel's fishing rod, wandflower or hairbell. Hand-coloured lithograph on paper by Walter Hood Fitch, 1866. Artwork from Curtis's Botanical Magazine, volume 92, plate 5555. Curtis's Botanical Magazine is the longest running botanical periodical featuring colour illustrations of plants and has been published continuously since 1787

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Matilda Smith, botanical artist Featured Curtis's Botanical Magazine Image

Matilda Smith, botanical artist

Matilda Smith, Joseph Hooker's second cousin, began training as a botanical artist in 1877, at the age of 23, and remained in Kew's employ for 45 years, producing more than 2300 drawings for Curtis Botanical Magazine. She became the Civil Service's first payrolled botanical artist. In 1916 she became president of the Kew Guild and in 1921 was accepted as an associate of the Linnean Society, only the second woman to receive this honour. Hooker's second cousin, began training as a botanical artist in 1877, at the age of 23, and remained in Kew's employ for 45 years, producing more than 2300 drawings for Curtis Botanical Magazine. She became the Civil Service's first payrolled botanical artist. In 1916 she became president of the Kew Guild and in 1921 was accepted as an associate of the Linnean Society, only the second woman to receive this honour

© RBG KEW

Spathodea campanulata P. Beauv. (Bell-flowered Spathodea) Featured Curtis's Botanical Magazine Image

Spathodea campanulata P. Beauv. (Bell-flowered Spathodea)

Original illustration from Curtis's Botanical Magazine, published as plate 5091, 1st January 1859. Watercolour and pencil on paper. This species is a native of western tropical Africa. The plant here figured was raised from seeds sent from Ashantee to Mr Osborne of the Fulham nursery. Schumacher also found it in Guinea. Kew possessed several fine specimens previously gathered by Mr Ansell on the Stirling Hills during the Niger Expedition

© RBG KEW