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Curtis's Botanical Magazine Gallery

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Illustrations selected from Curtis's Botanical Magazine

Choose from 197 images in our Curtis's Botanical Magazine collection.


Haemanthus quadrivalvis Jacq. ('Hairy-leaved Scarlet Haemanthus Featured Curtis's Botanical Magazine Image

Haemanthus quadrivalvis Jacq. ('Hairy-leaved Scarlet Haemanthus

Original illustration from Curtis's Botanical Magazine, published as plate 1523, 1st January 1813. Watercolour and pencil on paper. This species was introduced into Kew from the Cape of Good Hope by Mr Masson [Masson, Francis (1741-1805)] in 1774. This drawing was made from a plant that flowered in Mr Griffin's conservatory at South Lambeth in October 1812

© RBG KEW

Trichonema speciosum, Ker Gawl. ('Crimson Trichonema') Featured Curtis's Botanical Magazine Image

Trichonema speciosum, Ker Gawl. ('Crimson Trichonema')

Original illustration from Curtis's Botanical Magazine, published as plate 1476, 1st July 1812. Watercolour and pencil on paper. The currently accepted plant name is Romulea speciosa. Native of the Cape of Good Hope, this drawing was taken from a plant that flowered in Mr. Knight's greenhouse, King's-Road, Fulham, and which had originally been obtained from Mr. Hibbert's collection

© RBG Kew

Hoodia bainii, Dyer Featured Curtis's Botanical Magazine Image

Hoodia bainii, Dyer

Original illustration from Curtis's Botanical Magazine, published as plate 6348, 1st March 1878. Watercolour and pencil on paper. The specimen here figured was brought to England by Mr MacGibbon who obtained it from Mr Lycett of Worcester, South Africa. It flowered at Kew in July 1877. Hoodia plants are farmed commercially for their use as an appetite suppressant

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew