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Marianne North Collection (#6)

Victorian paintings

876 Items

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 522. View in the Cochineal Gardens at Santa Cruz, Teneriffe

522. View in the Cochineal Gardens at Santa Cruz, Teneriffe
Women taking off the rags in which the newly hatched insects (Coccus cacti) are pinned to the Cactus plants (Opuntia coccinellifera, Steud.)

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 519. A Species of Bugloss, Teneriffe

519. A Species of Bugloss, Teneriffe
Echium simplex, DC.), a stately tree-like herb about six feet high

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 507. Cluster of Air-roots of a Dragon Tree, Teneriffe

507. Cluster of Air-roots of a Dragon Tree, Teneriffe
These thick air-roots gradually grow downwards and cover the whole trunk which has been gashed and hacked by the collectors of Dragons Blood

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 497. Native Vanilla hanging from the Wild Orange, . Praslin, Seyc

497. Native Vanilla hanging from the Wild Orange, . Praslin, Seyc
Vanilla Phalaenopsis, Reichb. f. is endemic in the Seychelles, and, like several other species of the genus, it is leafless. The orange on which it grows is naturalised only in these islands

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 492. The Clove in fruit, and view over Mahe, Seychelles

492. The Clove in fruit, and view over Mahe, Seychelles
It is rare to see the clove tree in fruit where it is properly cultivated, because the cloves used as a condiment are the unopened flower buds. See 688

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 490. Fruit grown in the Seychelles

490. Fruit grown in the Seychelles
An attractive and delicious fruit is the Framboisier (Rubus rosaefolius, Sm.) in the boat of Banana leaf, with foliage and flowers by the side

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 487. Flowers of a bush and Pitcher Plant, Mahe

487. Flowers of a bush and Pitcher Plant, Mahe
The Pitcher plant is shown growing in a tangled mass on the huge granite boulder below; and beyond is the harbour of Mahe

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 472. Saponaire or Periwinkle and Green Frogs in Mahe

472. Saponaire or Periwinkle and Green Frogs in Mahe
Vinca rosea, Linn. and its variety alba, supposed to be a native of America, is now found wild in most hot countries

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 464. Palms in Mahe, Seychelles

464. Palms in Mahe, Seychelles
Besides the cocoa-nut, which may or may not have reached these islands ind ependently of human agency, there are eight species of Palm indigenous in the Seychelles

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 463. An Asiatic Pancratium, colonised in the Seychelles

463. An Asiatic Pancratium, colonised in the Seychelles

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 462. Screw-Pines in Praslin, Seychelles

462. Screw-Pines in Praslin, Seychelles
Various species of Pandanus or Screw-Pine constitute a prominent feature in the vegetation of the Seychelles, see 473 and 495

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 460. Ipomoea and Vavangue with Mahe Harbour in the distance

460. Ipomoea and Vavangue with Mahe Harbour in the distance
Vangueria edulis, Vahl, or Vavangue, is a native of Madagascar, and now cultivated (and naturalised) in many other warm countries for the sake of its edible fruit. Observe the wasps nest upon it

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 458. A Swamp Plant and Moorhen, Seychelles

458. A Swamp Plant and Moorhen, Seychelles
This beautiful plant (Hymenocallis rotata, Herb.) is a native of the West Indies, and is now half wild at Mahe. The Moorhen is remarkable for its very large feet

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 454. Ostrich Farming at Groot Post, South Africa

454. Ostrich Farming at Groot Post, South Africa
Ostriches are stripped of their feathers twice a year, the operation, it is asserted, causing the bird little pain. Certainly no permanent injury ensues for fresh crops of feathers are produced year

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 453. Yellow-wood Trees and Creepers in the Perie Bush

453. Yellow-wood Trees and Creepers in the Perie Bush
The Yellow Wood, Podocarpus Thunbergii, Hook. is one of the largest and most valuable of South African timber-trees; see panel of it below

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 446. Water-loving Plants and Kingfisher, near Grahamstown

446. Water-loving Plants and Kingfisher, near Grahamstown
Floating in the water is Limnanthemum Thunbergii, Griseb.. a member of the same family as the Gentians; in front two varieties of the tufted Eucomis punctata, Alt. with the rosy Disa racemosa, Linn

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 444. View of Cadles Hotel and the Kloof beyond, near Grahamstow

444. View of Cadles Hotel and the Kloof beyond, near Grahamstow

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 438. Wild Flowers of Ceres, South Africa

438. Wild Flowers of Ceres, South Africa
In the centre the yellow " Tea Plant, " Rafnia amplexicaulis, Thunb. the leaves of which are commonly used either alone or with ordinary tea to make a beverage

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 435. Protea and Golden-breasted Cuckoo, of South Africa

435. Protea and Golden-breasted Cuckoo, of South Africa
This magnificent Protea (P. speciosa, Linn.) grows about as tall as a man, and is remarkable alike for its thick, red-margined leaves, and its elegantly fringed bracts

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 430. Water-Lily and surrounding vegetation in Van Staadens Kloo

430. Water-Lily and surrounding vegetation in Van Staadens Kloo
Nymphaea stellata, Willd. the Water-Lily in this painting, is very widely spread in Africa and India, and there are white, blue, purple, and rose varieties

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 419. Not one Flower, but many in one, Van Staadens Kloof

419. Not one Flower, but many in one, Van Staadens Kloof
As mentioned in the description of 410, there are numerous flowers in the separate inflorescences of the Proteaceae, surrounded by coloured leaves or bracts. This is Protea cynaroides, Linn

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 418. The Glory of Table Mountain, Cape of Good Hope

418. The Glory of Table Mountain, Cape of Good Hope
This showy ground orchid (Dis grandiflora, Linn.) grows along the streams on the top of Table Mountain, and was formerly believed to be restricted to this region

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 417. Beauties of the Swamps at Tulbagh, South Africa

417. Beauties of the Swamps at Tulbagh, South Africa
Watsonia roses, Ker, one of the handsomest of the Iris family; Kniphofta abides, Moench. and Richardia hastata, Hook. a near ally of the species commonly cultivated in this country

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 409. Old Dutch Vase and South African Flowers

409. Old Dutch Vase and South African Flowers
This painting done at Groot Post gives some idea of the astonishing wealth in variety exhibited by the bulbous plants of South Africa

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 393. Part of the Residence, St. Johns, Kaffraria. 393. Part of the Residence, St. Johns, Kaffraria

393. Part of the Residence, St. Johns, Kaffraria. 393. Part of the Residence, St. Johns, Kaffraria
At the time of the Artists visit the whole " Residence" consisted of a number of Pondo Huts, one of which forms a part of this painting; and the tree overhanging it is the White Pear

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 385. Some grotesque plants from the Karroo, South Africa

385. Some grotesque plants from the Karroo, South Africa
In front on the right the singularly-formed and coloured flowers of Gomphocarpus grandiflorus, Benth. & Hook. f. a member of the Asclepiadaceae. On the left,

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 369. Strelitzia augusta at St. Johns Kaffraria

369. Strelitzia augusta at St. Johns Kaffraria
Trees of the same in the background, and Tecormaria capensis, Spach. trailing over the vegetation on the left (see 365)

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 367. A. Giant Kniphofia near Grahamstown

367. A. Giant Kniphofia near Grahamstown
Kniphofia is a genus of the Liliaceae numbering about twenty known species, which inhabit Eastern Africa, from Abyssinia to the Cape, and Madagascar. The species here represented (K)

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 361. Papyrus or Paper Reed growing in the Ciane, Sicily

361. Papyrus or Paper Reed growing in the Ciane, Sicily
In ancient times the Papyrus (Cyperus Papyrus, Linn.)was a plant of great importance, for from its stems was prepared the paper upon which the Egyptians wrote their books, etc

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 351. View of the Mountains from the railway between Durban and M

351. View of the Mountains from the railway between Durban and M
This view is from the highest part of the railway; the undulating foreground is dotted with Cycas trees. See 366

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 723. View of Mount Earnshaw from the Island in Lake Wakatipe, New Zealand

723. View of Mount Earnshaw from the Island in Lake Wakatipe, New Zealand
The trees in the foreground having dense tufts of narrow leaves at the ends of the branches, and large clusters of dirty-white flowers, belong to the Liliaceous genus Cordyline

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 348. Fruit de Cythere and Sugar Birds and Nest, Seychelles

348. Fruit de Cythere and Sugar Birds and Nest, Seychelles
The Fruit de Cythere (Spondias dulcis, Forst.) is an introduced and cultivated plant in the Seychelles and Mauritius. Some part of western Polynesia, where it is now widely spread

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 343. Foliage and Flowers of a Madagascar tree at Singapore

343. Foliage and Flowers of a Madagascar tree at Singapore
A tree of the same (Poinciana regia, Boj.) in the distance

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 339. Sunrise among the Pines near Fagoo, in the Himalayas

339. Sunrise among the Pines near Fagoo, in the Himalayas

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 319. Sandal-wood of India

319. Sandal-wood of India
Santalum album, L. is a small tree celebrated by the poets on account of the sweet scent of its wood. An oil is extracted which is used to incense temples, and also medicinally

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 316. The Akunda or Muda

316. The Akunda or Muda
Calotropis gigantea, R. Br. is also an Asclepiad, various parts of which are used medicinally; : and an exceedingly strong fibre is obtained from the branches

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 315. Peepul or Bo

315. Peepul or Bo
This is Ficus religiosa, Linn. a tree. commonly met with near temples and houses, which the natives are very unwilling to cut down at any time

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 314. Foliage and Fruit of two Indian Trees

314. Foliage and Fruit of two Indian Trees
They are Acacia Catechu, Willd. having spikes of small yellow flowers, and Terminalia citrina, Roxb. The former is a sacred tree, and yields a very astringent substance by decoction

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 313. Foliage and Fruit of the Mahwa

313. Foliage and Fruit of the Mahwa
Bassia latifolia, Roxb. is a timber tree, interesting also on account of its being one of the few plants whose flowers are eaten by the human race

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 311. The Kuddum or Cadamba

311. The Kuddum or Cadamba
Anthocephalus Cadamba, Miq. is a Rubiaceous tree often mentioned by poets. It has a deep yellow wood recommended for furniture. The yellowish-brown flowers are small and collected in dense balls

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 309. Foliage, Flowers and Young Fruit of the Mango

309. Foliage, Flowers and Young Fruit of the Mango
The Mango (Mangifera indica, L.) is generally regarded as one of the most delicious tropical fruits, though there are many varieties, differing very much in quality

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 308. The Soma-lata

308. The Soma-lata
Sarcostemma aphylla, Roxb. a sacred plant, from which a liquid is extracted that is used in Brahminical sacrifices. What the Soma of the Vedas may have been is still an unsolved problem

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 307. The Night Jessamine

307. The Night Jessamine
The very sweet-smelling flowers of Nyctanthes Arbor-tristi, Linn. open at sunset and fall about sunrise, so that it is unadorned during the day; hence the specific name, Arbor-tristis, or sad-tree

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 306. Foliage and Fruit of Fig Tree held Sacred by the Hindoos

306. Foliage and Fruit of Fig Tree held Sacred by the Hindoos
It is apparently Ficus glomerata, Roxb

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 305. The Gool-achin or Caracucha

305. The Gool-achin or Caracucha
A tree (Plumeria acutifolia, Poir.) of American origin, commonly planted in Indian gardens, and particularly in cemeteries, because it keeps the graves white with its daily fall of fragrant flowers

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 303. The Dhak or Bastard Teak

303. The Dhak or Bastard Teak
The Dhak (Buteafrondosa, Roxb.) is one of the most striking of the Indian arboreous Leguminosae; its wood and leaves and flowers, the latter dried and reduced to a fine powder, which is sprinkled

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 298. The Neem

298. The Neem
The Neem tree (Melia Azcadirachta, Linn.) is described by the poets as the type of all that is bitter; and its bark is said to be a fair substitute for Cinchona in cases of fever, &c

Background imageMarianne North Collection: 295. Holy Basil or Tulsi

295. Holy Basil or Tulsi
A most holy herb is Ocinmum sanctum, L. of the Mint order, grown in pots near every temple and dwelling of devout Hindoos. it is sacred to both Vishnu and Krishna




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