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729. A selection of West Australian Flowers Featured Image

729. A selection of West Australian Flowers

The bluish green plant in the lower left corner is the Salt Bush, apparently a species of A triplex, which covers thousands of miles of barren country, and will keep the sheep alive the first two years, until it is replaced by grass. Above are the sh

© RBG KEW

Art, Artist, Bluish Green, Lambertia Echinata, Leaves, Marianne North, Painting, West Australian Flowers, Yellow Flowers

435. Protea and Golden-breasted Cuckoo, of South Africa Featured Image

435. Protea and Golden-breasted Cuckoo, of South Africa

This magnificent Protea (P. speciosa, Linn.) grows about as tall as a man, and is remarkable alike for its thick, red-margined leaves, and its elegantly fringed bracts. Over a century ago (1786) Masson sent seeds of it to Kew, and the first plant flo

© RBG KEW

Art, Artist, Birds, Cuckoo, Flowers, Golden Breasted, Leaves, Marianne North, Painting, Protea, Purple, South Africa

Adansonia digitata, Willd. (Baobab or Upside-down tree) Featured Image

Adansonia digitata, Willd. (Baobab or Upside-down tree)

Watercolour on paper, no date (late 18th early 19th century). Hand painted copy of an illustration commissioned by William Roxburgh (1751-1815). In his Flora indica Roxburgh describes this plant as a tree which is very scarce in India, and probably not a native of Asia'. Roxburgh tells that in the Botanic Garden of Calcutta, where this tree blossoms in May and June, and ripens its seed in the cool season, there is a 25 years old plant of Adansonia digitata, with an irregular, short and sub-conical trunk, which is 18 feet in circumference. In a letter sent to Roxburgh the 2nd of July 1802, from Mantolle, in Sri Lanka, General Hay Macdowell notes: In my walk last night on the ruins of this once rich and extensive city, called by the natives Mande or Maddoo-ooltum, I chanced to observe a tree whose prodigious magnitude induced me to measure it...fifty feet in circumference, above six feet from the ground, the natives call it Peerig, and from what I have been able to collect, it is not indigenous here

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew