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Hyacinthus orientalis, 1827 Featured Image

Hyacinthus orientalis, 1827

Illustration of Hyacinthus orientalis, commonly known as hyacinth. Copperplate stipple-engraving, printed in colour, and hand-finished using watercolour by Pierre Joseph Redoute and engraved by Bessin, 1824 - 1833. Artwork from Choix des Plus Belles Fleurs: Prises dans Differentes Familles du Regne Vegetal et de Quelques Branches des Plus Beaux Fruits, volume 1, plate 94.

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

23. A Chilian Cactus in flower and its Leafless Parasite in fruit Featured Image

23. A Chilian Cactus in flower and its Leafless Parasite in fruit

Referring to the various Chilian landscapes, we see that columnar cacti are a conspicuous feature. This, the-commonest species, is Cereus Quisco, Gay, which grows to a height of 1.5 to 20 feet, and is often preyed upon by a leaf less parasite, Loranthus aphyllus, Miers (syn. L. cactorurn, Hook. et Arm). In this case both nurse-plant and parasite-are leafless ; in others it may be seen that the leaves of the two are often similar (see 21 and 734). In 26 the cactus and its parasite are shown in their natural habitat. The ripe white berries of the Loranthus are edible

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Erythronium dens-canis, 1787 Featured Image

Erythronium dens-canis, 1787

Illustration of Erythronium dens-canis, commonly known as dog's-tooth violet, trout lily or glacier lily. Hand-coloured engraving on paper by Sydenham Edwards, 1787. Artwork from Curtis's Botanical Magazine, volume 1, plate 5. Curtis's Botanical Magazine is the longest running botanical periodical featuring colour illustrations of plants and has been published continuously since 1787

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew