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Cactus Gallery

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Choose from 62 images in our Cactus collection.


Marianne North at her easel, circa 1883
Marianne North at her easel, circa 1883
23. A Chilian Cactus in flower and its leafless Parasite in frui
23. A Chilian Cactus in flower and its leafless Parasite in frui
Mesembryanthemum simplex, 1793
Mesembryanthemum simplex, 1793
Cochineal beetle harvest, by Eadweard Muybridge
Cochineal beetle harvest, by Eadweard Muybridge
14. Some Flowers of the Sterile Region of Cauquenas, Chili
14. Some Flowers of the Sterile Region of Cauquenas, Chili
185. Vegetation of the Desert of Arizona
185. Vegetation of the Desert of Arizona
Hoodia bainii, 1878
Hoodia bainii, 1878
Schlumbergera truncata, 1866
Schlumbergera truncata, 1866
Mammillaria rhodantha, 1830
Mammillaria rhodantha, 1830
Consolea moniliformis, 1821
Consolea moniliformis, 1821
Harrisia divaricata, 1821
Harrisia divaricata, 1821
Cleistocactus baumannii, 1850
Cleistocactus baumannii, 1850
Marianne North at her easel, circa 1883 Featured Image

Marianne North at her easel, circa 1883

Photograph of Marianne North (1830-1890), botanical artist, pictured here in Grahamstown, South Africa circa 1883.
Marianne North generally travelled unaccompanied, an extraordinary feat for a Victorian lady, only occasionally using letters of introduction to enable her to stay with the associates of those she met on her travels. Between 1871 and 1879, she visited Canada, the United States, Jamaica, Brazil, Japan, Sarawak, Singapore, Java, Sri Lanka and India. In 1880, Marianne met Charles Darwin, whom she regarded as the greatest man living, the most truthful as well as the most unselfish and modest'. On his suggestions, she set off on a further voyage, this time encompassing Australia and New Zealand. In 1882 she visited Africa, the final continent left unrepresented in her work

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Copiapoa marginata, 1851
Copiapoa marginata, 1851
Pseudorhipsalis alata, 1828
Pseudorhipsalis alata, 1828
Pilosocereus royenii, 1832
Pilosocereus royenii, 1832
Opuntia tuna, 1848
Opuntia tuna, 1848
Echinocactus platyacanthus, 1850
Echinocactus platyacanthus, 1850
Thelocactus buekii, 1853
Thelocactus buekii, 1853
Echinocereus scheeri, 1906
Echinocereus scheeri, 1906
Cylindropuntia imbricata, 1909
Cylindropuntia imbricata, 1909
Parodia ottonis, 1842
Parodia ottonis, 1842
Leuenbergeria bleo, 1836
Leuenbergeria bleo, 1836
Echinopsis oxygona, 1835
Echinopsis oxygona, 1835
Pseudorhipsalis amazonica, 1919
Pseudorhipsalis amazonica, 1919
Leuenbergeria bleo, 1836 Featured Image

Leuenbergeria bleo, 1836

Hand-coloured lithograph on paper by William Jackson Hooker, 1836. Current accepted plant name is Leuenbergeria bleo, commonly known as rose cactus or leaf cactus. Artwork from Curtis's Botanical Magazine, volume 63, plate 3478.
Curtis's Botanical Magazine is the longest running botanical periodical featuring colour illustrations of plants and has been published continuously since 1787

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Pelecyphora aselliformis, 1873
Pelecyphora aselliformis, 1873
Carnegiea gigantea, 1878
Carnegiea gigantea, 1878
Carnegiea gigantea, 1862-1865
Carnegiea gigantea, 1862-1865
Selenicereus grandiflorus, 1799–1810
Selenicereus grandiflorus, 1799–1810
Ferocactus hamatacanthus, 1852
Ferocactus hamatacanthus, 1852
Mammillaria mammillaris, 1697-1701
Mammillaria mammillaris, 1697-1701
Echinocactus rhodophthalmus, 1850
Echinocactus rhodophthalmus, 1850
Coryphantha octacantha, 1848
Coryphantha octacantha, 1848
Echinocereus cinerascens, 1848
Echinocereus cinerascens, 1848
23. A Chilian Cactus in flower and its Leafless Parasite in fruit
23. A Chilian Cactus in flower and its Leafless Parasite in fruit
Mammillaria laui subs dasyacantha
Mammillaria laui subs dasyacantha
Watering cacti, RBG Kew
Watering cacti, RBG Kew
23. A Chilian Cactus in flower and its Leafless Parasite in fruit Featured Image

23. A Chilian Cactus in flower and its Leafless Parasite in fruit

Referring to the various Chilian landscapes, we see that columnar cacti are a conspicuous feature. This, the-commonest species, is Cereus Quisco, Gay, which grows to a height of 1.5 to 20 feet, and is often preyed upon by a leaf less parasite, Loranthus aphyllus, Miers (syn. L. cactorurn, Hook. et Arm). In this case both nurse-plant and parasite-are leafless ; in others it may be seen that the leaves of the two are often similar (see 21 and 734). In 26 the cactus and its parasite are shown in their natural habitat. The ripe white berries of the Loranthus are edible

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Desert plants
Desert plants
Melocactus matanzanus
Melocactus matanzanus
Carnegiea gigantea
Carnegiea gigantea
Cleistocactus baumannii
Cleistocactus baumannii
Pilosocereus piauhyensis
Pilosocereus piauhyensis
Parodia mueller-melchersii
Parodia mueller-melchersii
Mammillaria mystax
Mammillaria mystax
Echinopsis spiniflora
Echinopsis spiniflora
Echinocereus pamanesiorum
Echinocereus pamanesiorum
Echinopsis oxygona
Echinopsis oxygona
Echinocereus klapperi
Echinocereus klapperi
Echinopsis huascha
Echinopsis huascha