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South America Collection

Background imageSouth America Collection: 138. View of the Bay of Rio and the Sugar-loaf Mountain, Brazil

138. View of the Bay of Rio and the Sugar-loaf Mountain, Brazil
Marianne North painting 138

Background imageSouth America Collection: Flowers of Datura and Humming Birds, Brazil

Flowers of Datura and Humming Birds, Brazil
Oil on canvas, no date. According to the gallery guide, Datura arborea, Linn. [Brugmansia arborea L.] is a native of tropical America, and is commonly cultivated in other countries

Background imageSouth America Collection: 1. Victoria regia

1. Victoria regia
This majestic plant and largest off all Water Lilies inhabits many of the rivers of the north-eastern part of South America

Background imageSouth America Collection: Scene in Dr. Lunds Garden at Lagoa Santa, Brazil

Scene in Dr. Lunds Garden at Lagoa Santa, Brazil
Oil on board, no date. According to the Official Guide to the North Gallery, Fifth Edition, 1892, The large trunk in front covered with a Cactus (Cereus, sp.), a large aroid (Philodendron, sp.)

Background imageSouth America Collection: 43. Tijuca, Brazil, with a Palm in the foreground

43. Tijuca, Brazil, with a Palm in the foreground
The palm is apparently a species of Cocos, a considerable genus restricted to South America, except C. nucifera, the cocoa-nut

Background imageSouth America Collection: 066, Screw Pines and Avenue of Royal Palms in the Botanic Gardens, Rio

066, Screw Pines and Avenue of Royal Palms in the Botanic Gardens, Rio
The Screw Pine to the left in the foreground is a male plant in flower (see 246), and that on the right is a female in young fruit (see 692)

Background imageSouth America Collection: 86. Lagoa de Freitas, near Rio, Brazil

86. Lagoa de Freitas, near Rio, Brazil
Cypress and Frangipani (Plumeria sp.) trees in the foreground

Background imageSouth America Collection: A tall Brazilian Climber

A tall Brazilian Climber
Oil on board, no date. According to the Official Guide to the North Gallery, Fifth Edition, 1892; This is Aristolochia brasiliensis, Mart. & Zucc. var

Background imageSouth America Collection: The Cinchona Region of South America, 1862

The Cinchona Region of South America, 1862
The shaded area indicates the native distribution of cinchona trees in the Andes. From Peruvian Bark: A Popular Account of the Introduction of Chinchona Cultivation into British India, 1860-1880

Background imageSouth America Collection: Amaryllis Divers, 1845 - 1883

Amaryllis Divers, 1845 - 1883
Current accepted plant name is Hippeastrum sp. commonly known as amaryllis. Hand-finished lithograph from Flore des Serres et des Jardins de l Europe by Louis Van Houtte, 1845-1883, volume 16

Background imageSouth America Collection: 33. Flowers of Cassia corymbosa in Minas Geraes, Brazil

33. Flowers of Cassia corymbosa in Minas Geraes, Brazil
A South American forest tree whose twin leaflets close together at sunset. The insects Pterochroya ocellata are called Leaf Insects (see 676)

Background imageSouth America Collection: Sir Joseph Banks (1743-1820)

Sir Joseph Banks (1743-1820), wealthy philanthropist, natural history lover, patron and first unofficial director of Kew Gardens from about 1773

Background imageSouth America Collection: 440. Earth-nut and a Prickly Gourd, St. Johns, Kaffraria

440. Earth-nut and a Prickly Gourd, St. Johns, Kaffraria
Arachis hypogaea, Linn. the Earth-nut, is one of a few plants belonging to various families, which, after flowering, wriggle their seed-vessels into the earth, where the seed ripens

Background imageSouth America Collection: Phaedranassa schizantha

Phaedranassa schizantha
an IUCN listed vulnerable flowering bulb from Ecuador

Background imageSouth America Collection: Joseph Banks

Joseph Banks
Sir Joseph Banks (1743-1820), wealthy philanthropist, natural history lover, patron and first unofficial director of Kew Gardens from about 1773

Background imageSouth America Collection: 64. Foliage and fruit of mammae apple, or South American Apricot, 1880

64. Foliage and fruit of mammae apple, or South American Apricot, 1880
A tropical American tree (Mammea americana, L.) of the Guttiferae, cultivated for its fruit, the outer rind of which is bitter; but the flesh is sweet and aromatic, and is made into preserves



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