Skip to main content

Teneriffe Collection

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 527. Cherokee Rose with the Peak of Teneriffe in the distance

527. Cherokee Rose with the Peak of Teneriffe in the distance
The Cherokee Rose (R. laevigata, Michx.) although very common in the South- eastern States of North America is only a colonist there; its native country being China

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 505. Common Aloe in Flower, Teneriffe

505. Common Aloe in Flower, Teneriffe
The rocky slope covered with a dense thicket of the same plant, (Aloe vera, L.) which is a native of South Africa. Aloes or Bitter Aloes is the dried juice of this and other species of the genus

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 511. Dragon Tree in the Garden of Mr. Smith, Teneriffe

511. Dragon Tree in the Garden of Mr. Smith, Teneriffe
The Dragon Tree, or more correctly the Dragons Blood Tree (Dracaena Draco, L.), is a native of Teneriffe, and is one of the most celebrated trees in the annals of natural history

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 506. Dragon Tree at Orotava, Teneriffe

506. Dragon Tree at Orotava, Teneriffe
This is the largest descendent of the famous tree of which a short history is given under 511

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 525. Old Manor of Castro, Teneriffe

525. Old Manor of Castro, Teneriffe
Tree-heath (Erica arborea, L.) and Cinerarias (Cineraria cruenta, L.) in blossom. This is the wild parent of the many coloured varieties of Cineraria grown in greenhouses in this country

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 510. View of the Peak from the bridge of Icod, Teneriffe

510. View of the Peak from the bridge of Icod, Teneriffe
Bananas and Date Palms in the foreground

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 503. Dragon Tree at San Juan de Rambla, Teneriffe

503. Dragon Tree at San Juan de Rambla, Teneriffe

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 814. View in the Garden of Acclimatisation, Teneriffe

814. View in the Garden of Acclimatisation, Teneriffe
The plant with yellow flowers in the left corner is a species of Sonchus, behind which rise the crimson spikes of an Aloe; and at the back is a fine American Wigandia

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 815. Barranca de Castro, Teneriffe

815. Barranca de Castro, Teneriffe
Tree Heather, Laurels, Goats, and Shepherds in blankets and topboots

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 528. Aloe and Cochineal Cactus in Flower, Teneriffe

528. Aloe and Cochineal Cactus in Flower, Teneriffe
Aloe vera L. and A. barbadensis, Mill. and Cochineal Cactus, Opuntia coccinellifera, Steud

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 526. The Canary Islands Pine at Icod, Teneriffe

526. The Canary Islands Pine at Icod, Teneriffe
The vegetation of the Canary Islands presents some strange anomalies, not the least interesting of which is the pine (Pinus canariensis, Ch. Smith) associated with the Date palm

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 523. Dragon Tree in a garden at Santa Cruz, Teneriffe

523. Dragon Tree in a garden at Santa Cruz, Teneriffe
The thick protuberances below the point where the branches are given off are air-roots; they are represented natural size in 507. See the description of 511

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 522. View in the Cochineal Gardens at Santa Cruz, Teneriffe

522. View in the Cochineal Gardens at Santa Cruz, Teneriffe
Women taking off the rags in which the newly hatched insects (Coccus cacti) are pinned to the Cactus plants (Opuntia coccinellifera, Steud.)

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 521. Scene in Mr. Smiths Garden, Teneriffe

521. Scene in Mr. Smiths Garden, Teneriffe
An arbour covered with the Cherokee Rose (527), and Bougainvillea (108) creeping over Cypress and Myrtle trees

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 518. Dracunculus canariensis and Cineraria in Flower, Teneriffe

518. Dracunculus canariensis and Cineraria in Flower, Teneriffe

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 516. Abyssinian Ensete in a garden in Teneriffe

516. Abyssinian Ensete in a garden in Teneriffe
Musa Ensete, Gmel. is the most ornamental of the genus, but its fruit is not edible. It was first discovered by Bruce more than a century ago;

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 515. A View in the Botanic Garden, Teneriffe

515. A View in the Botanic Garden, Teneriffe

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 514. View of Puerto de Orotava, Teneriffe, from the Sitio del Pa

514. View of Puerto de Orotava, Teneriffe, from the Sitio del Pa
Top of a Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera, L.in the foreground. The Date Palm, though cultivated in Southern Europe and Western Asia, is really more at home in North Africa)

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 513. View of Sitio del Pardo, 0rotava, Teneriffe

513. View of Sitio del Pardo, 0rotava, Teneriffe
The succulent plants on the rocks in the foreground belong to the genera Kleinia, Aloe, Euphorbia, Opuntia, &c. Plants having thick

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 512. View of the Peak of Teneriffe

512. View of the Peak of Teneriffe
Cacti (Opuntia) and other succulent plants in the foreground; the candelabrumlike inflorescence on the right belongs to the American Aloe (A gave americana, L.)

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 509. Houseleek and Canary-birds in Teneriffe

509. Houseleek and Canary-birds in Teneriffe
Several kinds of Houseleek (Sempervivum) are very common on roofs and rocks and other dry situations, in the Canaries. Serinus canarius is the scientific name of the canary-bird

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 508. A Cactus-like Plant growing close to the sea in Teneriffe

508. A Cactus-like Plant growing close to the sea in Teneriffe
This singular shrub (Euphorbia canariensis, Linn.) forms a characteristic feature of the vegetation of the lower zone in the Canaries

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 507. Cluster of Air-roots of a Dragon Tree, Teneriffe

507. Cluster of Air-roots of a Dragon Tree, Teneriffe
These thick air-roots gradually grow downwards and cover the whole trunk which has been gashed and hacked by the collectors of Dragons Blood

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 504. Group of Flowers, painted in Teneriffe

504. Group of Flowers, painted in Teneriffe
The cactus (Opuntia Dillenii, Haw.) lying in front of the vase is cultivated for its spines, which are used to fasten the bags of cochineal insects to another kind of cactus

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 502. Flowers of the Pomegranate, painted in Teneriffe

502. Flowers of the Pomegranate, painted in Teneriffe
The Pomegranate (Punica Granatum, L.) is believed to be a native of North-Western India; but, as in the case of most plants that have been cultivated from remote times

Background imageTeneriffe Collection: 524. View of Icod, Teneriffe

524. View of Icod, Teneriffe
Reeds (Arundo Donax, L.) on the high ground to the left, and Cochineal Gardens below



For sale as Licensed Images

Choose your image, Select your licence and Download the media