Skip to main content
sales@mediastorehouse.com
Home > History

History Gallery

Choose from 376 images in our History collection.


Joseph Reardon pictured during service in WWI Featured History Image

Joseph Reardon pictured during service in WWI

Joseph Reardon joined the staff as a gardener in July 1914, having trained at Tully Nurseries, Kildare. He attended Kew's "Mutual improvement Society" scoring the highest numbers in Economic Botany and in October 1914 lectured on Alpines in ireland for the same course. In October 1915 he left to become an Assistant at Cambridge Botanic Gardens, Massachusetts, where he was appointed Curator four years later. He is portrayed here during his wartime naval service

© RBG KEW

Matilda Smith, botanical artist Featured History Image

Matilda Smith, botanical artist

Matilda Smith, Joseph Hooker's second cousin, began training as a botanical artist in 1877, at the age of 23, and remained in Kew's employ for 45 years, producing more than 2300 drawings for Curtis Botanical Magazine. She became the Civil Service's first payrolled botanical artist. In 1916 she became president of the Kew Guild and in 1921 was accepted as an associate of the Linnean Society, only the second woman to receive this honour. Hooker's second cousin, began training as a botanical artist in 1877, at the age of 23, and remained in Kew's employ for 45 years, producing more than 2300 drawings for Curtis Botanical Magazine. She became the Civil Service's first payrolled botanical artist. In 1916 she became president of the Kew Guild and in 1921 was accepted as an associate of the Linnean Society, only the second woman to receive this honour

© RBG KEW

William Dallimore Featured History Image

William Dallimore

William Dallimore (1871-1959), known to his colleagues as "good old Dallimore" was a well-liked and long serving member of staff at RBG Kew for more than 45 years. He joined Kew as a student gardener in 1891, aged 20, and worked in the Palm House, the tropical Propagating Pits and the Arboretum, of which he became foreman (now termed curator) in 1901. This undated photograph shows him as a young man, possibly in his student days, carrying tree-pruning equipment. He later became Keeper of the Museums, established the Wood Museum and supervised the development of the National Pinetum at Bedgebury. He was regarded as one of the leading authorities on trees and shrubs in the UK

© RBG KEW