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Home > Images Dated > 2007 > December > 3 Dec 2007

Images Dated 3rd December 2007

Choose from 626 images in our Images Dated 3rd December 2007 collection.


No. 767. Study of the Bunya-Bunya Featured 3 Dec 2007 Image

No. 767. Study of the Bunya-Bunya

Oil on board, no date. Study of the Bunya-Bunya. This noble Conifer, Araucaria Bidwillii, Hook. is perhaps the most valuable food-tree indigenous in Australia, and only grows on one semi-circle of hills, within 100 miles in stretch, between the Brisbane and Burnett rivers, Queensland. The larger of the older trees are nearly 200 feet high, with a circumference of trunk of about twenty-five feet; and the horizontal markings on the pillar-like trunks make them very conspicuous amongst other trees. But what is most remarkable about these trees is that they are the only hereditary property any of the aborigines are known to possess. Each tribe has its own group of trees, and each family a certain tree or trees; and any interference with these rights leads to a bloody fight. The larger cones are a foot long and nine inches in diameter; and they are full of edible nuts (seeds) as large as chestnuts. Every third year there is an extra large crop, when the natives assemble from all parts to collect it. By an act of the Colonial Government the Bunya-Bunya is strictly preserved for the use and sustenance of the aborigines. Look at 713, 771, 773'. [Entry from the Official Guide to the North Gallery'. Fifth Edition, 1892]

© RBG KEW

Calanthe versicolor, 1838 Featured 3 Dec 2007 Image

Calanthe versicolor, 1838

Watercolour on paper. Original drawing for plate XLII in John Lindley's Sertum orchidaceum: a wreath of the most beautiful orchidaceous flowers; selected by John Lindley, published in 1838. Illustration shows part monochromatic, part colour study of leaves and flowers. Side figure represents lip and ovary with the sepals and petals cut away. Inscribed in pencil by Miss Drake along top edge, The upper bracts slightly hairy, sweet scented, and Sion Gardens Aug. 31 18..'[date has been cropped]. There is a semi-circular blob of red paint or possibly sealing wax on the top edge of drawing. Also inscribed in a different hand Rec'd. 15.9.1925 lower right corner. Drawing taken from flower held in the collection of His Grace the Duke of Northumberland at Sion. According to Lindley's publication It is a native of the East Indies, whence it has also been sent from the Botanic Garden, Calcutta, to the Horticultural Society

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Stapelia reticulata, 1814 Featured 3 Dec 2007 Image

Stapelia reticulata, 1814

Original illustration of Stapelia reticulata, currently accepted as Huernia reticulata, commonly known as netted-flowered stapelia, from Curtis's Botanical Magazine, published as plate 1662, 1st August 1814. Watercolour and pencil on paper. In 1814, this species could be found in the hollows of rocks, near North Olifant's River, South Africa.
Curtis's Botanical Magazine is the longest running botanical periodical featuring colour illustrations of plants and has been published continuously since 1787

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew