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Livistona mauritiana (chinensis) from the Company School Collection, ca 1700-1800 Featured Botanical Art Image

Livistona mauritiana (chinensis) from the Company School Collection, ca 1700-1800

Water colour of Livistona mauritiana, by unknown artist from The Company School Collection, ca 1700-1800

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Art, Art On Demand, Biology, Botanical, Botanical Illustration, Botanicals, Botany, Carey, Illustration, Kew, Kew Gardens, Library, Livistona, Livistona Mauritiana, Palm, Plant, Plant Portrait, Plant Structure, Tree, Watercolour

23. A Chilian Cactus in flower and its Leafless Parasite in fruit Featured Botanical Art Image

23. A Chilian Cactus in flower and its Leafless Parasite in fruit

Referring to the various Chilian landscapes, we see that columnar cacti are a conspicuous feature. This, the-commonest species, is Cereus Quisco, Gay, which grows to a height of 1.5 to 20 feet, and is often preyed upon by a leaf less parasite, Loranthus aphyllus, Miers (syn. L. cactorurn, Hook. et Arm). In this case both nurse-plant and parasite-are leafless ; in others it may be seen that the leaves of the two are often similar (see 21 and 734). In 26 the cactus and its parasite are shown in their natural habitat. The ripe white berries of the Loranthus are edible

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Citrus acida, R Featured Botanical Art Image

Citrus acida, R

Watercolour on paper, no date (late 18th, early 19th century). Hand painted copy of an illustration commissioned by William Roxburgh (1751-1815). In his Flora Indica, Roxburgh writes: Under the above definition I mean to comprehend the various varieties, if not species, of the sour lemons or limes found in India, and as the petioles are very generally winged I think it necessary to separate them from the lemons and citrons which have not that mark, or have it in a very trifling degree. Roxburgh then describes nine different varieties which he has studied in Bengal, ...the whole being cultivated under my own eye, in the Botanic garden [Calcutta], and are arranged according to the estimation in which they are held by both natives and Europeans. These varieties are: 1) Pati-Leboo, or Neboo; 2) Kaguji-Neboo; 3) Gora-Neboo; 4) China-gora-Neboo; 5) Camaral-Neboo; 6) Rungpore Lime; 7) Taba-Neboo; 8) Arabian Lime from Muscat; 9) Meetha Lemoo

© RBG KEW